I’m Back. For real this time.

Welcome back to the blog.

I am in the process of a facelift on this beast, and lots of new content from my world. As everything in life changes and evolves, I knew my blog would need to do that as well. Once a year I get the urge to get back into blogging and then I don’t commit fully.

Times are changing.

Here is what you can stay tuned for in new content. I will ALWAYS feature my passion for the beef industry and modern agriculture.

  • Adventure: I travel A LOT, so why not share some of the cool place I go and all of the good food I eat. And not to mention my personal goal of finding the best coffee shops in rural America. If you’ve got some wifi signal and a hot Americano, I am coming for you.
  • Cows: Lots and lots of cows.
  • Waco the Bandit: He’s cute so why not.
  • Fashion stuff: I love to tell stories, fun boots and even more than that I love to meet great people and hear how they got to where they are. Typically, this involves me on the road and in the need of some piece of clothing I forgot for whatever event. And or I just find some amazing people doing really cool things.
  • The world around me: I’ve got cool people I meet and love every day, so why not showcase what they are doing.
  • Technology: If you aren’t joining, you are falling behind. I love technology, so if I find something cool I will do my best to share it with you.

Stay tuned!

#Cattletales

Who needs a nap? I sure do following over a month of crazy travel and trade shows. This week was full of social media work for the day job, follow ups and reflections on the chaos. 

The reflections on chaos and a week in Nashville for NCBA gave me the energy to get back to telling my #cattletale. And hopefully accessing audiences that are not cattle producers. 

Today, bull sales are officially kicking off for me. It’s one part of my story. The story and greater goals for life tied to the business. We will get to that goals part later. 

I was excited to leave the house this morning, which is a first in nearly a week. And to be sporting my new #cattletales pin on my work vest. It’s simple, highly noticeable, and one thing that wI’ll hopefully lead to more conversations about the beef industry. 


Go grab another cup of coffee, and get out there sharing your story or #cattletales. 

Wordless Wednesday: Snaffle Bit

Hey, baby let’s go to Reno. 

I have never said that, and I don’t think that’s how the saying goes…
But either way, we went and had a ball.

Terrible photo, but we had a blast this weekend in Reno at the Snaffle Bit Futurity. It was an amazing weekend laughing with old friends, making new ones, attempting to sell some horses and learning a ton.
  

Totally Ridiculous Opinion Needed

“Wait, what did you do with Paula?”

I would guess that 97.9 percent of people that know me, know that my beast of a car was better known as Paula. I often referred to her as such, and that the inanimate object that she was or is, was pretty much my consistent partner in crime. And I say crime, because she had several runs in with the law.

The day came last week, that I decided that she needed to go see greener pastures or whiter lines. So, with that, I bought a new car. It has sport shifters, and multiple other features that are making my weekly gypsy life seem almost like a life luxury. And yes, Mom and insurance agent Kerri, I promise to use the cruise control.

Either way, I took a little sampling via, SnapChat last week to determine the possible names for the actual poll. This poll as you guessed it will determine the official name for my new car. As you can tell, this is highly scientific, and you should answer the question below as such.

With that, I need your opinion, and I will take additional suggestions.

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Wordless Wednesday: Tour

To everyone that is partaking in the Northwest Hereford Tour this week, I am jealous. Fall might be my favorite season, and it certainly it is shaping up to be an amazing week to be out looking at some of the finest ranches in the west. 

So here is a flashback photo to the first week in October in 2011. Charles and my sister and I took the afternoon to look at cows, and the views were stunning.

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What we wouldn’t give for some snow to be falling on the Wallowas this week.

Wordless Wednesday: Future

This little lady as I keep calling her, or better known as X54 has picked up quite a few likes on my Facebook profile. So I thought I would share her over here as well. 

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Check out Chandler’s sale page for sibs of this heifer, while she isn’t for sale, there are others in the pen that are just as striking. And the sale ends tomorrow!

Simply, Why is the Beef Industry Important

Simply saying it, why is the beef industry important? A recent conversation with an industry peer challenged me to state my opinion of this question. 

Preservation and utilization of natural resources, producing lean beef and critical by-products, stimulating rural and urban economies and continuing a family heritage for the next generation are the simply points why I am passionate about the beef industry in the U.S. and around the world.

Our planet is comprised of numerous diverse ecosystems; within those systems are multiple ways to manage the natural resources while cultivating products that further a modern society. Cattle are a tool for management systems that allow rangelands, other grasslands and feedstuffs to be converted to valuable lean beef, while producing by-products that are base element in numerous everyday products.

Beef is my favorite protein that helps me maintain a health lifestyle, and is a component in so many of my favorite products and critical items that could save my life if needed. Nothing is wasted, and every resource that was used to create the nutritious beef or the by-product continues on in the cycle of life.

In my travels throughout the country, I have seen rural communities thriving and major ports shipping beef products all over the world. The common factor that connects all of us is the the success in the beef industry. When downtown districts are thriving in rural America, you know there are good things going on down the chain. In good times, or bad, the cattle business is continually turning dollars back in our economies.

Beef product has also been my family’s livelihood for nearly 130 years. The original goal was to provide beef to the gold miners during the gold rush in the late 1800’s it turned into a lifestyle that has raised six generations, thousands of head of quality Hereford cattle and preserved the land for generations to come. At the end of the day, all of my goals come back to the ranch. I want to have a career furthering agriculture and the beef industry while raising a family that gets to experience life around livestock and the people that make the industry so great.

My passion for the beef industry comes from a long line of ranchers, but my education and experiences have continued to show me that we can raise beef that fits the environment and meets customer demands. Now, I challenge you to share you opinion about why the beef industry is important to you.

My best days are spent looking at good Hereford cows.

Spring calving cows at the ranch in Baker, Oregon. 

TimeHop Update

A year ago I posted this jewel a year ago to social media land. 

  

And as of a day, not a lot has changed but yet everything has…

  • I cleaned up the bird poo in my car…embarrassing and just strange.
  • I am on the road interviewing again today without cuffed pants or those damn heels. They are for sale on my Poshmark account, I wish they next person good luck. And the scar on my knee is going away. Slowly. 
  • The lovely Kansas City Police Department is readily approaching two years since an officer hit me and still nothing has been done. 

I enjoyed this little trip down memory highway. 

Wordless Wednesday: Moore. 

 Rambler

This one time I got a speeding ticket in Madeline, California. My State Trooper Father thought it was comical and asked if I questioned the officer about the location of Moore, California. I passed through Moore, Montana today. I think this counts for something, right Dad? #happyearlybirthday #misshim

SAGE CENTER TOUR

SAGE of Sustainable Agriculture and Energy Center

SAGE, in much of the western United States the first thought of the word sage is joined with brush. It’s pretty when it’s green, it provides habitat for sage grouse, and multiple other animals. But the sage I am talking about is the SAGE of Sustainable Agriculture and Energy Center in Boardman, Oregon. This I-84 visitors center provides hands on learning, graphics and experiences to visitors about modern agriculture and how western Umatilla and Morrow Counties. This region has grown to be one of the most unique and diverse agricultural regions in the world.

I have been back in eastern Oregon over a year, and have been talking about taking a guided Port of Morrow tour with my friend Anna and making a stop at the SAGE Center for months. Finally, I did it. I wanted to show a college friend who was in town from Texas, and equally as passionate about agriculture what we do in eastern Oregon, and how and what people are doing at the Port of Morrow.

Heather and I loaded up with Anna as she drove us around the port describing the processing facilities, energy resources, wood and ethanol plants, freezing and shipping buildings and grain export terminal that is shared by two local grain marketing cooperatives.

Heather and I taking it all in.

Heather and I taking it all in.

As we are still in the midst of the west coast port crisis, the importance of agricultural product transportation finally slapped me in the face. Have you really ever stopped to think what it really takes to move raw and finished products to the consumers of the world?

View from the Port of Morrow offices looking on to the Columbia River.

View from the Port of Morrow offices looking on to the Columbia River.

The cost for either moving products by truck or train are ridiculous than barge. The Columbia River is a priceless asset to Oregon and Washington agriculture not just for the small trickle of water that is used for irrigation, but for moving products in a timely, cost effective manner. There is an awesome display, that was my favorite part of the SAGE Center tour, unfortunately I didn’t snap a picture of it… Here are the facts though:

Barges move 1 ton of grain 500 miles on a single gallon of fuel. Compare that to semi trucks that moves 1 ton of grain only 60 miles on a single gallon, and you’ll see why grain barges still hold the keys to grain export.

Needless to say, I loved the SAGE Center and our personal tour of the Port. (Thanks Anna!) Here are some of my pictures and video from our adventure in Boardman.

Some farmers, ranchers and food production plants are accessing water from the Columbia River currently. There is current plans to utilize more water from the river to support agricultural production in the region. This will only be done with strict management practices. Currently, the river (the gallon jug for visual reference) is flowing at he average annual flow for the Columbia River at The Dalles, Oregon is approximately 190,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) (1 cfs = 448.8 gallons per minute). And the amount of water that is removed from the river for irrigation or energy purposes is less than one half of a percent, or represented as just over a tablespoon.

Some farmers, ranchers and food production plants are accessing water from the Columbia River currently. There is current plans to utilize more water from the river to support agricultural production in the region. This will only be done with strict management practices. Currently, the river (the gallon jug for visual reference) is flowing at the average annual flow for the Columbia River at The Dalles, Oregon is approximately 190,000 cubic feet per second (cfs) (1 cfs = 448.8 gallons per minute). And the amount of water that is removed from the river for irrigation or energy purposes is less than one half of a percent, or represented as just over a tablespoon.

"Generations of our family have cared for this ranch and its natural resources an in turn the ranch as cared for our families, livestock, wildlife while providing quality beef to feed many people. It is a privilege, a challenge, and at times a burden. But we do take a lot pride in what we do and produce. Ranches are an essential part of a successful economy for our county, state, and country." -- Mark and Tami Rietman, Triangle Ranches, Heppner, Oregon

“Generations of our family have cared for this ranch and its natural resources an in turn the ranch as cared for our families, livestock, wildlife while providing quality beef to feed many people. It is a privilege, a challenge, and at times a burden. But we do take a lot pride in what we do and produce. Ranches are an essential part of a successful economy for our county, state, and country.” — Mark and Tami Rietman, Triangle Ranches, Heppner, Oregon

Want to learn how french fries are really made?

So this beauty of a tog boat was one of the last to sail the pre-dammed Columbia River. Check out the movie Sagebrush Sailors for more history of this brave or slightly crazy river cowboys!

So this beauty of a tug boat was one of the last to sail the pre-dammed Columbia River. Check out the movie Sagebrush Sailors for more history of this brave or slightly crazy river cowboys!

Next time you a driving through Boardman, take an hour or so and check out the SAGE Center, and keep supporting Oregon agriculture!